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Thursday, February 29, 2024

How Hyderabadis will navigate dating in 2024

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Bumble, the women-first dating app, released its annual predictions trends for 2024.  Bumble’s new research* reveals dating in 2024 will see a shift in how singles are dating, who they’re dating and who they are themselves. 

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Looking ahead, 2024 is set to be the ‘year of self’ in dating and relationships with more people looking inwards at what they value and want. Heading into 2024, there is an air of optimism and clarity for the ‘year of self’ as Bumble’s research** shows that more than half (59%) of Indian women surveyed are going into the new year with a clear view of what they want from their romantic lives.  

Findings from Bumble’s new research in India show people in Hyderabad  are focusing on personal prioritisation, which is leading to rejecting the constant strive for perfection, and placing more value on their mental health, emotional vulnerability, self-acceptance, and shared priorities. GenZ, in particular, are vocal about values and are motivated to go after what they want when it comes to romance, are breaking away from traditional dating norms, and challenging outdated relationship timelines and relationship expectations. 

‘Betterment Burnout’: people in Hyderabad are defying pressures to ‘self optimise’

Bumble’s research shows Hyderabadis are feeling the pressure to constantly look for ways to better themselves. From biohacking and starting your day at 5am, to plugging into self-help podcasts, there has been a rise in people ‘self-optimising’ – striving to become a perfect version of themselves. This has led the majority (84%) of singles surveyed in Hyderabad to constantly look for ways to better themselves, with 63% feeling unworthy of a partner if they haven’t invested in themselves. Bumble’s dating trend Betterment Burnout’ refers to how looking ahead to 2024, singles in Hyderabad are rebelling against the constant self-improvement with 83% of singles in Hyderabad (and 80% of LGBTQ+ daters) surveyed, saying they are taking active steps to be happier with who they are here and now. 76% of people surveyed in Hyderabad (and 75% of LGBTQ+ daters),  now emphasise self-needs over constant self-improvement. This is equally relevant to Millennials (75%) and GenZ (77%). In fact, 61% of Hyderabadis surveyed will now only date people who will not try to change them

When asked about what are the pressures people in Hyderabad face to self-improve in order to date, for 44% of Hyderabadis it’s social expectations that makes them want to self-improve in order to date, followed by desire for self-growth (38%), personal insecurities and parental expectations (both 37%), fear of rejection (35%), external comparisons (28%), previous relationship experiences (27%). 

‘Slow life’ over hustle culture

53% of people surveyed in Hyderabad say they want to choose the ‘slow life’  (acceptance for who you are, being happy here and now) more than hustle culture, while 47% of Hyderabadis value inner fulfilment over external validation and 43% of Hyderabadis will embrace authenticity over perfection looking ahead in 2024.

Val-Core Dating: Rise in shared priorities, valuing engagement on issues that matter 

Singles in Hyderabad today are looking for shared priorities and expect their partners to not only care about social causes but to actively engage. Val-Core Dating refers to the rise of people valuing engagement on issues that matter to them. 70% of people surveyed in Hyderabad are more attracted to someone who actively engages in societal issues. This is also relevant for over half (63%) of LGBTQIA+ daters in Hyderabad. For 73% of Hyderabadis it’s important that a potential partner not only cares, but actively engages in social causes and issues. For 64% of Hyderabadis not caring about social issues or social causes (justice, freedom, equality, etc.) is a dealbreaker in a potential partner. In fact, for 68% of Hyderabadis it is important that their potential partner is aware of current politics and votes. When it comes to dating, Bumble’s research shows that women are less open to someone with differing political views as for 58% of women surveyed in Hyderabad, it is a turn off if someone they are dating is not aware of current societal issues

Samarpita Samaddar, India Communications Director, Bumble shares, “It’s encouraging to see daters in Hyderabad are taking charge of their dating journeys. We know that cultural conversations around misogyny, women’s rights, and social issues, that are intertwined with our dating lives, left many exhausted this year. This has impacted the way people want to date – people are feeling more empowered in their sense of self and seeking out people who value what’s important to them, whether it’s social causes, lifestyle choices or even their favourite sports. 

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